Skip to main content

About this collection

On February 1, 2003, the Space Shuttle Columbia disintegrated as it re-entered the Earth's atmosphere. As it traveled across the United States from west to east en route to the John F. Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the shuttle began breaking up due to damage sustained during takeoff. Seven astronauts, including an Israeli Air Force colonel, lost their lives on Columbia's 28th and final mission. Much of the debris landed in East Texas and Louisiana, resulting in a long recovery effort by government officials, military units and volunteers.

 

Donation of Materials

This collection is the result of many contributors who donated their time and energy into the project. Contributors include those who participated in the oral histories conducted by the East Texas Research Center, the SFA Geography and Forestry Departments which created detailed maps of the debris field, volunteers who photographed the recovery efforts and the school children who through art interpreted the tragedy that landed in their own backyards.  Material collected in 2003 by Connie Hodges, Cynthia Keedy, Shanna Guillote, and Jerry McShane and 2013 by Jennifer Brancato.

 

Project Information

The Shuttle Columbia exhibit was a collaborative project between the East Texas Research Center and the Center for Digital Scholarship. Mark Musquiz created the online exhibit during the Fall 2013 semester.

 

Exhibit Creator Mark Musquiz, Graduate Student,

 

Website Deisgner Dillon Wackerman, Digital Archivist

 

Editor Linda Reynolds, Director, East Texas Research Center

 


 

The Collection

Maps

The items in this collection detail the Columbia tragedy and its impact on the East Texas region. It includes oral histories, written testimonies of witnesses and volunteers, mappings of the debris field, photographs and video of the recovery efforts.

Browse Maps

 

Oral Histories

Included in the Columbia are the accounts of persons who were affected by the disaster or who helped in the recovery efforts. Three of these oral histories are presented in the collections.

Browse Oral Histories

 

Childrens' Art

Also included are works of art from local schoolchildren who interpreted the tragedy as theyunderstood it. Their contributions include written reports of what happened either to the crew or to them on that day, crayon drawings that portray the shuttle or their feelings about space exploration.

 

Browse Childrens' Art

 



More Information

NASA: Columbia

Hemphill Museum

Space.com: Columbia Shuttle Disaster Infographic

Space Shuttle Columbia Collection, 2003-2013 at the East Texas Research Center



 
Select the collections to add or remove from your search
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
 
OK